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20120701
20120731
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SFGTV2 27
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English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Jul 23, 2012 9:00pm PDT
single day. i am so happy and fortunate that he is a great young man, and god uses a son that doesn't speak to teach me so many things all day every day. i rarely talk about that because if it hits to the core of may. and that is why i have learned the necessary needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the thin
SFGTV2
Jul 19, 2012 9:00pm PDT
than you are today. use this resource. work to improve yourself because you will have a happier life in the end. will see it on one of my morning walks or bike rides. thank you very much. >> my goodness, what a rich a day. we can all have hope and not be fearful about anything. we take that attitude that we can reverse things. haute not going to tell them what my next birthday is going to be. she was born in 1932. one woman looked up at me and says, dear? she found out it was ok. we can all have the ability to do whatever we want to do. when she is not wrapping -- rapping, she is the co-director on the center for elder abuse and neglect, the university of california, irvine. a program called the institute of aging to 2007, i am proud to serve on that board. from catholic university in washington, who is started with the first song. there is no excuse for elder abuse. >> i am very happy to be here to talk to you all a little bit about elder abuse. there is about 5 million people. ♪ a little louder. you want me to rap? ♪ i need some help. my brain elasticity is not too god. i -- go
SFGTV2
Jul 2, 2012 8:30pm PDT
. i use google for an hour or two or three every day and my work and in my life. what a wonderful tool. it reduces exercise in thought through the momentary process of looking up information. we don't have to know where we are anymore. we can have someone tell us exactly where we are in the world. and we are also adding noise by the way we live our lives. we can compensate by trading in our brains in recovery direction and we can use technology to do that. how do you reverse age-related cognitive decline? you have to work on the skills and abilities that support accurate vision, balance, and body. you also have to exercise the brains learning machine. if it is slowly dying off. this is really important. it is about reestablishing your ability to operate in the world with all of its gloria's details. we accomplished that in part, or we a help accomplish that by constructing computer-based exorcises that use these basic strategies to try to drive these changes and integrate them with high efficiency. these exercises that are available and computers for you to look at today provide the ea
SFGTV2
Jul 16, 2012 8:30pm PDT
that science and how we try to apply in use it to helping people in need. first of all, i want to say that there is a special thing about this plasticity as it relates to ourselves. that is to say it is constructed on the basis of moment to moment association of things that go together or the things that are expected to occur in the next moment in time. one thing that always goes with everything we feel, everything we do, every act we have had, every thought is a reference to the actor, to the player, to the doer, and that references to ourself. all of that derives massive plastic self-reference. we have to construct and enrich a strongly center itself, a person, in our brain through its changing itself in a powerful, plastic way. we're also constructed through these same processes to attach to the other people, to the other things we are close to in life. that is the basis of the attachment of the mother to the child or the child to the mother. through millions of the events of contact and interaction, all of those counts in ways that actually grow the child into the person that is t
SFGTV2
Jul 23, 2012 5:30am PDT
the contractors working with us. we have exceeded our lbe goals and hiring goals. the jobsi am very happy to be dg the project and i want to assure you the project will be completed on time and we will be able to accommodate those big ships bringing thousands of people to san francisco. thank you for the opportunity to speak. [applause] >> thank you, muhammed, everyone at dpw. my job is really fun. i get to meet some of the most fascinating people around the world. the one that fascinate me the most have to be the one that spend their lives at sea. so i want to reduce next the president of metro crew stores. -- cruise tours. he is a sea captain graduate from the arena university in genoa, italy. he has sailed world wide for many years. he has worked for princess cruises and crystal cruises before joining metro services. he has a master captain's license. he is a member of thepeople to . thank you for the opportunity to speak. [applause] >> thank you, u.s. coast guard area maritime security committee. he is also a member of the international cruise line council security. we could not have a better
SFGTV2
Jul 1, 2012 1:30am PDT
time you spend in training is useful. everyone can operate successfully or effectively with that and they can go as far as it can. it is optimized for rate improvement, you get the most bang for your buck. it is expensive because there is a lot to fix, or you can say a lot to strengthen. you have to get to a lot that relate to receive information. and using it can thought. it is important that the outcome or the benefits of this be confirmed. it is like a gold standard trial the confirm that you do receive the benefit of the program is designed to deliver. everybody doesn't have an equal benefit, the brain is too complex for this. even find that information, and you can also find information for those of you coming to the workshop that my daughter and i are doing this afternoon. it will also provided information on computers here at that meeting. what do we know from the science? you can see the scientific references and see where the studies were done at different research universities, the mayo clinic, harvard, and other places to see what the confirmation is all abou
SFGTV2
Jul 16, 2012 10:30pm PDT
was with us in 2009. goopublic works is here. this reminds us of the 3000 people but passed away in 1906 from the devastating earthquake, but the rebirth of our city is with us. i have been in all of these other positions where we are always prepared. and we are already engaged in recovery efforts. we were there with a whole staff. we have six we assure you that when the next big event happens, that water system will be there for us to deliver water with that 24 hours. a huge change from depending on this fountain. we are handing it off to generations of youth in the city to understand -- make sure they're prepared. go to our website, it tells you all the things there. iti is about having those items prepared.w we will survive. that is how we get ready and celebrate and honor the people who left us and make sure our city is ready. thank you for being here. congratulations to our survivors. >> very nice job. behind me is a good friend and a great firechief. you go back 106 years. braxton morning. -- good morning. one of the survivors could not be with us. those are amazing changes. it does giv
SFGTV2
Jul 2, 2012 6:00am PDT
's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function cont
SFGTV2
Jul 6, 2012 11:30am PDT
the city's approach to developing economies? >> in the chair of the land use committee this year, and i was vice chair last year with our former chair from the bayview hunters point area. i guess i approach land use and economic development from a different perspective. i'm not against development, but i want it to be equitable so we look at the lowest income populations or even middle income populations so that residents have a strong say as development moves forward, whether it is the park ridge said development in the southern, western part of the city or even treasure island with there's many low-income families that currently live there. but it is a strong voice for the residents that currently are there. we also want to see new people moving into the city, and hopefully, we focus also on families and housing that provides better homes and home opportunities for families, but i always say that i support equitable development. i also do feel that big business and downtown interests usually dominate the discussion on development. i want to see a balance of those forces, but also with
SFGTV2
Jul 6, 2012 1:30pm PDT
particular projects to give us insight on? >> one was a basic infrastructure thing that was a big deal. san francisco circle. not a lot of people realize that more cars travel through one of those intersections than any other in san francisco. we had to shut that down and completely rebuild the intersection for the muni winds utilities, and overheads. we pulled it off. we got through it. now we have pedestrians walking through safely. we have the trains going through. it is cleaner, faster, safer. vehicles can get through there. it is a small thing, but quality of life when you do not have to deal with a bus stuck in the intersection -- that was a big deal. i am proud of the way the mta got through the major project without causing major problems. >we have lots of park improvements happening that will definitely benefit our youth. playgrounds the within the last few years have been renovated. for the entire community, a suspected is the young people that benefit best. >> talk about the merchant district and some of the things that will be important for the development of local businesses in
SFGTV2
Jul 17, 2012 10:30am PDT
facing the city. welcome. thank you for joining us today. tell us about your background, where you grew up, went to school, and what kind of jobs to have had. >> i grew up in the philadelphia area, in new jersey. i went to school up and down the east coast. i went to undergrad at duke university. i went to law school at harvard. after clerking for a judge, i came out here in 1997. i have been here for the last 14 years. i have always lived in the castro. i am an attorney. i started out in private practice. i settle private law firm during complex commercial litigation. in 2002, and moved over to the sentences the city attorney's office where i worked on the trial team doing trials for the city, handling my own cases, and supervising a team of attorneys as well. >> why did you choose to live in san francisco? >> i always assumed i would go back to the philadelphia area since that is where my family is. i was always interested in san francisco in terms of what it is as a city, its culture, it's amazing lgbt community. i came out here for a summer, fell in love with it. i have been interes
SFGTV2
Jul 20, 2012 1:30pm PDT
the toughest issues facing the city. welcome, supervisor. thank you for joining us. let's start by talking about your background -- where you grew up, what kinds of jobs you have work. supervisor chu: my parents immigrated to the united states about 30 years ago, and i would say that is probably the most formative part of my background. growing up in an immigrant family, you learn many things. my parents raised me in southern california, and i grew up in the restaurant business. they had a small restaurant at the time, and i was there every weekend, working -- well, not working, eating. having a fried egg roll, wanton, something good. it taught me the value of working hard and what it meant to be part of a small business, a small business -- a small business, small family, and an immigrant family at that. really being impacted by the los angeles riots, when that occurred, put me on the path toward public policy and understanding what it meant to have opportunities and not have opportunities in our various communities. >> why did you choose to live in san francisco? supervisor chu: i came t
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)